see you soon

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off to Portugal in the morning!
I do get around, dont I!
wont be posting on my blog much cos its too fiddly on my phone
dont forget me
might make a few more small acrylic sketches like last time
but I will be mostly on this ferry back and forth from the beach across the lagoon – very cultural ๐Ÿ™‚

recent favourites

seeding  oil and wax 80cm sq canvas

seeding
oil and wax
80cm sq canvas

storm oil and wax 50cm sq panel

storm
oil and wax
50cm sq panel

untitled oil and wax on paper

untitled
oil and wax on paper

where from and where to now oil and wax on panels 40 x 60 cm

where from and where to now
oil and wax on panels 40 x 60 cm

oil and wax on panel 50cm sq

oil and wax on panel 50cm sq

evening sky oil and wax on panels 40cm sq

evening sky
oil and wax on panels 40cm sq

my studio

my studio


I@m away for a week in Portugal. Sun sun sun sun ๐Ÿ™‚
So here are some recent favourites to keep you all happy
see you next week ๐Ÿ™‚

6 new works with wax

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where from and where to now
2 panels 40 x 60 cm

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straits and absorbing
2 panels 40 cm square

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4 leaves and territories
2 panels 50cm square

Liz Doyle is building a new collection of abstract works in oils and cold wax medium on wooden panels
The panels are the highest quality from Milliken Bros
The wax is Gamblin wax from T Lawrence in the UK imported from USA
The oils are best quality with proven lightfastness, mostly from Gerstaeker in Germany
Liz also uses Sennelier oilbars

Liz is working on themes to do with land, territory, migration, erosion and the environment. The layers of wax and oil are built up with a roller and palette knife. The layers are drawn onย  and scraped through with a knife revealing hidden colours and adding texture. The wiggly lines evoke ancient migration routes and territorial boundary changes. Liz’s inspiration comes from her passion for her rugged home landscape in Donegal, Ireland and her extensive travels, most recently in the Himalayas in Nepal, in Italy and Portugal.

Liz Doyle is looking for galleries in Ireland, and any city galleries in Europe or USA who would like to be the first to show these new works

Please contact her in the first instance through this blog or by email on liz-doyle@live.com

6 new works with wax

image

image

where from and where to now

2 panels 40 x 60 cm

image

image

straits and absorbing

2 panels 40 cm square

image

image

4 leaves and territories

2 panels 50cm square

Liz Doyle is building a new collection of abstract works in oils and cold wax medium on wooden panels

The panels are the highest quality from Milliken Bros

The wax is Gamblin wax from T Lawrence in the UK imported from USA

The oils are best quality with proven lightfastness, mostly from Gerstaeker in Germany

Liz also uses Sennelier oilbars

Liz is working on themes to do with land, territory, migration, erosion and the environment. The layers of wax and oil are built up with a roller and palette knife. The layers are drawn onย  and scraped through with a knife revealing hidden colours and adding texture. The wiggly lines evoke ancient migration routes and territorial boundary changes. Liz’s inspiration comes from her passion for her rugged home landscape in Donegal, Ireland and her extensive travels, most recently in the Himalayas in Nepal, in Italy and Portugal.

Liz Doyle is looking for galleries in Ireland, and any city galleries in Europe or USA who would like to be the first to show these new works

Please contact her in the first instance through this blog or by email on liz-doyle@live.com

wax on wood

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New work in cold wax and oil on beautiful cradled wooden panels made by Milliken Bros.
Abstract with no starting point or theme at the outset.
However, the works are beginning to talk to me about land and territory, borders and trade routes.
Maybe because I live in the Republic of Ireland, close to the border with Northern Ireland. Maybe because I have just visited the Eastern Algarve in Portugal, close to the Spanish border. Maybe because the shapes emerging remind me of coastal contours with trade routes across the sea. Read what you like