graffiti and vandalism

I haven’t quite known how to share my recent works and talk about them here up till now. I’m having a bit of ‘breakdown’ perhaps. Not an illness. Just in painting terms. I am experimenting with pouring paint. Over older dry paintings. It’s hard to explain why. Or what it means. I hope this aggressive, bold use of strong colour, with forms forming themselves, directed by gravity and manipulated by the tilt of the canvas or a blot with tissue, will lead somewhere. In the meantime maybe they can say something for themselves.

On Facebook a friend commented that I am bringing graffiti and vandalism into the studio. Yes! I think the friend is right. Sometimes we need to force a change. To fight off the status quo.

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My ‘poured’ paintings to go to Florida gallery!

So excited to be able to share that the 9 ‘poured’ paintings that I made in the last few days have ALL been requested by Mark Borghi Fine Art for his Palm Beach gallery in Florida

http://www.borghi.org

Voyage

Voyage
Paintings by Liz Doyle
October 20th-November 30th 2018

Opening Reception: Saturday, October 20th 6 – 8 pm
Mark Borghi Fine Art
2426 Main Street
Bridgehampton, NY11932

“Color and light are the foundation behind Liz Doyle’s bold yet transient paintings. Her works are focused meditations that challenge what is seen and unseen and how one’s surroundings affect an artist’s vision.
Working in oil and cold wax medium on canvas and board, the paintings are mostly modest in scale. Doyle uses bright palettes exploring a range of jewel and earthy hues, not unrelated to where the paintings may lead the viewer in their sense of place.

The atmospheric light conditions rendered through wax paper paint application contrast with the bold textural scrape lines on the surface of the paintings. These lines, often appearing as scratches take on triangular shapes and break through the surface of the two-dimensional picture plane offering another dimension. Their presence in the works emit a force, providing a grounding element as though tethering sails to a ship, or flaps on a tent to the ground. The lines are a constant reminder of our connection to the earth.

Existing in the realm of metaphor the paintings elicit moments of personal motif and signage. They reference maps and mountains, both ways to trace one’s bearings, as would be needed during a journey travelling by sea or space, such as the exhibition’s title describes. While the work is informed by the artist’s surroundings at her time of making, they emit a sense of water and land. This is perhaps a byproduct of daily visualization of what is on the artist’s mind or in her sight. Doyle relates the tethering lines to having a directional element—something that moves from point A to B. She relates this imagery in her paintings, to being able to see the mountains on the skyline from her studio and how they ground her in knowing where she is and when she is. These references between what is seen, felt and explored with a focus on painting itself give homage to artists such as Joan Mitchell and Robert Motherwell.”

Please rsvp to lucy@borghi.org